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hris Perri Law is a criminal defense law firm located in Austin, Texas.

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Chris' Blog

The blog of Chris Perri Law, written by Chris Perri and Shannon Perri. Read the latest in exciting cases where justice is served.

Filtering by Tag: criminal lawyer

New Study Exposes How Texas Criminal Justice System Values Finality Over Accuracy

Chris Perri

Photograph by  Stephanie Ezcurra

Photograph by Stephanie Ezcurra

In my post-conviction practice, I often feel like my clients don’t get a fair shake. Evidentiary hearings are rare, and the trial judge always seems to sign off on the State’s proposed findings of fact, which are critical when appealing an adverse ruling.

A recent study of Harris County death-penalty cases by Jim Marcus and the UT Capital Punishment Clinic confirms what I’ve suspected from experience: our criminal justice system values finality over accuracy. Judges are literally executing people without affording them the opportunity to fully present their claims. And the judges are pretty open about their bias, as they “rubber stamped” the State’s version of events in 95% of the cases studied. In fact, 34 out of the 40 judges adopted every proposed finding of fact presented by the State – that’s an astounding figure because it’s impossible for the State to be right 100% of the time.

In my practice, I’ve encountered the same difficulties in getting a hearing for my clients. Judges simply don’t want to re-open old cases, even though wrongful convictions are common. At a writ conference that I attended a few years ago, one judge described the general judicial attitude towards writs: they don’t like them. Why? Because writs open up old matters on their dockets, and judges don’t like seeing those cause numbers from a decade ago popping up. Also, due to the large number of pro se writs being filed by incarcerated inmates, the judges figure that if they start hearing every claim raised on every writ, they won’t be able to devote sufficient time to their trial docket.

For these reasons, it’s vital to have an experienced attorney present the writ in a manner that grabs the judge’s attention and shows the judge that the conviction is a gross injustice in light of the new evidence presented in the writ. However, even with a quality attorney, judges far too often deny evidentiary hearings and resolve the contested issues on the basis of affidavits. This deprives attorneys of the ability to cross-examine adverse witnesses, which is one of the only meaningful ways of uncovering the truth.

The new study is a groundbreaking because it provides the first concrete evidence of the widespread judicial bias against writ applicants in Texas’ criminal justice system, effectively denying them procedural due process. This issue can be litigated on appeal to the federal system when a defendant’s writ application is unfairly denied by Texas courts, and the study can serve as proof supporting a claim that Texas’ writ system violates the constitutional right to due process. 

All this said, awareness is the first step to change. This study brings to light an important injustice that we as a society must face. If our justice system values truth, then it must provide everyone an opportunity for a full and fair hearing. Liberty is too important for shortcuts.

If you do find yourself or a loved one wrongfully convicted, call Chris Perri Law at (512) 917-4378 for a free consultation to learn about your options. If you are my client, I will do everything in my power to zealously fight for your rights amidst a flawed system.

Recent U.S. Supreme Court Ruling Gives Cops Even More Leeway, But Chris Perri Law Will Strike Back

Chris Perri

Last month, the United States Supreme Court issued a surprising opinion that’s created waves of concern in the criminal defense circle. In Heien v. North Carolina, a North Carolina police officer noticed that one of the brake lights on the defendant’s vehicle was not working, so the officer pulled the defendant over believing that having a broken brake light was a violation of North Carolina law. A subsequent search of the defendant’s vehicle revealed cocaine, resulting in his arrest. The defendant attempted to suppress the evidence on the basis that he didn’t commit a traffic violation. The North Carolina courts reviewed the relevant traffic statute, and they determined that as long as one brake light is working, no crime has occurred.

Since the defendant didn’t commit a traffic violation, the stop was illegal, and the evidence of the cocaine should be suppressed. Seems simple, right? According to an 8-1 majority of the Supreme Court, that doesn’t end the inquiry, as courts must examine whether the officer’s mistaken belief about the law was reasonable. Here, the North Carolina law was somewhat ambiguous because another statute mandated that all “rear lamps” be functioning, and it’s not unreasonable to interpret a brake light as a type of rear lamp. Thus, even though the officer’s interpretation of the law was incorrect, this interpretation was reasonable at the time of the stop.

The Supreme Court’s analysis is problematic. Aren’t police officers supposed to know the law? And if they don’t know the law, how can anyone deem this lack of knowledge reasonable when the officers are trained experts on what’s illegal? If a medical doctor performing an appendectomy mistakenly removes your spleen instead of your appendix, we call that malpractice, and there’s no wiggle room for the doctor to argue that the mistake was reasonable. Apparently, cops get much more leeway.

Many defense attorneys are concerned that Heien might be a slippery slope. Will prosecutors now defend all unlawful stops on the basis that the officer’s mistaken belief about the law was reasonable at the time of the stop?

I say bring it on. I plan to argue that Heien applies to only a tiny set of scenarios: those in which the law is ambiguous and there’s no case precedent that clarifies this ambiguity. In Texas, most of the traffic laws are pretty clear cut. For example, it’s not a crime to swerve within your own lane as long as your car doesn’t cross into another lane. If an officer stops someone for swerving but the defense proves that the car never crossed into another lane, the prosecution won’t be able to argue that the officer reasonably believed that swerving within one’s own lane is against the law. That’s because, unlike the North Carolina law at issue in Heien, there’s no ambiguity in the law in my hypothetical example.

Still, I anticipate that prosecutors will attempt to use Heien as a tool to validate otherwise unlawful stops. As a result, it’s important to retain an experienced, knowledgeable defense attorney to persuade the courts that Heien doesn’t apply.