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512-917-4378

hris Perri Law is a criminal defense law firm located in Austin, Texas.

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Chris' Blog

The blog of Chris Perri Law, written by Chris Perri and Shannon Perri. Read the latest in exciting cases where justice is served.

Filtering by Tag: Chris Perri

Three things to do if you get pulled over by a cop—and you’ve been drinking.

Chris Perri

Photograph by  Jeffrey Smith

Photograph by Jeffrey Smith

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, just under 1% of licensed drivers will be arrested at some point in their lives for driving while intoxicated. The chance of it happening to you may seem slim, but like all statistics, it happens to someone.

Hopefully you never find yourself pulled over with a flashlight at your window, but if you do, it’s better to know what to expect and be prepared. It could make the difference in the outcome of your case.

1. Accept that you may get arrested. Even if you’ve had just one drink, if a cop smells alcohol on your breath, you’re now their responsibility. They don’t want to be liable for letting someone who is potentially drunk on the road. If you refuse to blow into the breathalyzer, you will almost certainly get arrested, but that doesn’t necessarily mean blowing is the right call, as the accuracy behind the machines is questionable. Stay calm and wrap your mind around the possibility of one night in jail. Remember, an arrest does not mean a conviction.

2. Start building your defense—now. Your entire interaction with the cop is being recorded and will be used in determining the outcome of your case. Be polite to the officer, speak minimally, and consider if blowing into the breathalyzer and/or performing the sobriety tests will help or hurt your case. It can be tempting to try the tests to prove your innocence, but, remember, they’re challenging even when sober, so if you’ve been drinking, even lightly, it’s possible that attempting the tests will make you appear more inebriated than you are, especially if you have a medical condition. That’s why if you’ve accepted you might go to jail and focus on providing as little incriminating evidence against yourself as possible, you’ll be better off in the long run. Ultimately, it’s your call and your right to decide how to proceed in the moment. It’s also worth nothing that refusing the tests may allow the state to suspend your driver’s license. Still, a good criminal defense attorney can usually help you get an occupational license.

3. Remind yourself that this moment will pass. You are going to be okay. Assuming no one was hurt, the worst part of this experience will be the arrest. People in this position often feel ashamed, alone, and scared. It’s important to remember that you will get through this. You are more than just one bad night. And if you hire a qualified, compassionate defense lawyer, you’ll have support for the rest of the process. For some, a DWI arrest is a turning point for the better. The experience can be a wake-up call to address a problem, while for others it’s a reminder that none of us are perfect. And sometimes, it was just an unfair arrest. Obviously, no one wants to spend the night in jail, but remembering that it won’t last forever and there will be support on the other side often helps people make it through.

If you are someone you care about has been arrested for a DWI or another crime, call criminal defense attorney Chris Perri at (512)917-4378 for expert guidance.

Chris Perri Argues to the 5th Circuit why Colton Pitonyak Deserves a New Trial

Chris Perri

Last Tuesday, August 27th 2013, Chris Perri argued to a three-judge panel of the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on why his client Colton Pitonyak deserves a new trial. This notorious case has received expansive media attention, and for good reason.

For the past four years, Chris Perri fought for the case to be reexamined due to an alleged Brady violation. For further background on the case, please view one of our older, informative blog posts here.

Intrigue and mystery have laced this case from the inception. Many have speculated who actually murdered and mutilated Jennifer Cave’s body. Though Colton Pitonyak was convicted of her murder, evidence withheld by the prosecution team points to Laura Hall as the actual killer.

Capturing the attention of the 5th Circuit, Chris stated that while in the Travis County Jail, Laura Hall confessed to two other inmates that she committed the murder. These inmates then told a counselor, who recorded the information in Hall’s electronic jail file. Chris argued that had this information been made available to the defense, Pitonyak’s trial strategy would have been entirely different and most likely led to a not guilty verdict.

The learned judges grilled Chris about whether any prior Supreme Court case had established a duty on the part of a mental-health counselor to disclose such exculpatory evidence to the prosecution team (and, thus, ultimately the defense attorneys).  While conceding that there was no such case, Chris persuasively argued that based on the Supreme Court’s Kyles v. Whitley case, the actual prosecutors had a duty to search Hall’s jail file due to the reasonable foreseeability of exculpatory evidence within that file.  After all, the prosecutors knew that Hall was talking to other inmates, including a cell mate who ended up being the prosecution’s star witness at Hall’s trial on Tampering with Evidence.  By turning a blind eye to the contents of Hall’s jail file, the prosecutors committed a Brady violation. 

Furthermore, even if the prosecutors had been blocked from accessing medical information within Hall’s jail file, they had a duty to obtain a court order or subpoena because the right to a fair trial trumps medical privacy laws. The State’s attorney countered that a subpoena for this information had been quashed, but Chris pointed out that this argument was disingenuous because it was Pitonyak who filed the subpoena while investigating the Brady claim in 2009.  The State, with the prosecutors’ blessing, actually quashed the subpoena in order to hinder Pitonyak’s ability to develop the claim.

The 5th Circuit should issue a ruling in the next month or two, though they have no official deadline.

See below to read a few noteworthy news articles and videos with Chris Perri featured:

Articles: 

Austin Chronicle article

Statesman article

The Daily Texan article

Videos: 

KXAN video 

My Fox Austin video

Keye TV video (1)

Keye TV video (2) 



 

 

 

 

 

 

Do you really have the right to remain silent?

Chris Perri

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In the wake of the recent Supreme Court ruling in Salinas vs. Texas, Chris Perri Law fears that the high court has whittled away the right to remain silent.

In Salinas, the Court ruled that the prosecution can use your pre-arrest silence against you at trial, thus watering down the essence of the Fifth Amendment’s protections against self-incrimination. In Salinas’ case, prior to being arrested, he voluntarily provided the police with information regarding a murder. However, when authorities asked if Salinas’ gun would match the murder weapon, Salinas refused to answer, under the assumption that he was exercising his Fifth Amendment right not to incriminate himself. However, at his trial, the prosecution used his choice to remain silent as damning evidence of his guilt.

The Supreme Court reviewed this ruling, and although it was a close call, the Court ruled that the conviction should be upheld, stating that if individuals want to invoke the Fifth Amendment’s protection, they “must claim it”.  Although the Fifth Amendment clearly states that no one can be forced to be a witness against him or herself in a criminal matter, the Court’s ruling means that the prosecution is free to use the defendant’s pre-arrest silence as evidence of guilt.

Chris Perri Law fears that in light of the Supreme Court’s recent ruling, the Fifth Amendment’s protection against self-incrimination has been vastly diluted.  Basically, to claim the rights of this fundamental law, individuals must explicitly inform the authorities that they are invoking their Fifth Amendment right to silence upon being questioned by law enforcement. Chris Perri worries that this requirement especially hurts less educated individuals, who may not be aware of this new ruling. “It creates a further class divide in our system,” Chris Perri says.

In order to maintain your Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination, Chris Perri Law advises you to explicitly state that you’re invoking your Fifth Amendment right when the situation calls for it.  Otherwise, your silence could come back to bite you.

Chris Perri Law convinces State of Texas to dismiss case against man facing felony drug charge

Chris Perri

Chris Perri Law proves to be successful in the face of injustice yet again. Police searched Chris’ client’s home in North Texas and arrested the client for a state-jail -felony amount of marijuana (between four ounces and five pounds). The client faced up to two years in prison as well as the stigma of a felony conviction.  Within six weeks of hiring Chris Perri Law, Chris was able to convince the prosecutor to dismiss the entire case. The client will now be able to get the arrest expunged from his record next year.

Utilizing his exceptional skill in navigating case law, Chris pointed out to the prosecutor that the information the police used to obtain the search warrant was gathered illegally. Thieves burglarized the client’s home and stole the client’s marijuana. The police caught the burglars and asked them how they acquired so much marijuana. The burglars then became informants and pointed the finger on Chris’ client, a victim of burglary.

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However, case law states that information obtained through illegal activity cannot be used to obtain a warrant. Just like police must gather information through legal channels, so must anyone else if it will be upheld in court.

As a public citizen, I feel thankful that the courts dismissed the case because it shows our system values justice and sets a standard that illegally gathering information to hurt someone else is unacceptable.  It is shocking to think that without the help of Chris Perri Law, this man who was involved in no violent activity or crime of moral turpitude, could have been a convicted felon, never allowed to vote again.

Chris Perri convinces Appeal Courts to consider New Trial for Pitonyak

Chris Perri

The News of the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals’ Grant of Certificate of Appealability

About a week ago, I heard an exuberant scream coming from our home office late in the evening. As the wife of a passionate, half-Italian criminal defense attorney, I’ve heard this sound before. However, when I entered the room to inquire further, I quickly surmised from his face that the news he received was far greater and more meaningful than I first assumed.

The 5th Circuit Court of Appeals had granted Colton Pitonyak and his attorneys the opportunity to appeal the issue of a Brady Violation. Chris read to me the words from the Court that stated “the impact of the Brady Violation is perplexing and the claim deserves further review.”

After years of Chris working vigorously to get the Courts to recognize the need to explore the details of the Pitonyak case further, I knew how much this meant to him. To Chris, his legal assignments are not just a way to pay the bills, but a way to be a part of how we as humans decide to navigate the muddy trenches between right and wrong. And when Chris smells the possibility of infringement on freedom and justice, especially when it leads to someone spending a 55-year prison sentence behind bars for murder, potentially wrongfully so, like with Colton Pitonyak, he will not stop fighting for what he believes in.

What Does This Mean?

Brady Violation

After getting past the emotional impact this had for Chris and Joe Turner, the other attorney involved in the Pitonyak writ, I wanted to further understand what the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals’ grant really means. As a social worker by training, I take a lot of interest in the human stories told throughout the criminal justice system, as this system is partly a reflection of our society’s values.

I learned that firstly, one must understand that a Brady Violation occurs when the prosecution’s failure to disclose evidence to the defense deprives the defendant of a fair trial.

Overturn of Prior Federal Denial

I also learned that prior to applying for the right to be heard at the 5th Circuit Federal level, Chris first had to exhaust all claims at the state court level. The state courts denied Chris’ request and stated that “the admission [of Hall’s 2005 confession] would have no reasonable impact on the trial”. Chris then filed his writ in the federal district court, but they denied him as well. That didn’t stop Chris from persevering forward to the 5th Circuit Federal level, where Chris argued that the “federal court was woefully misguided” about the law. The federal district court had denied Pitonyak the right to appeal the case to the 5th Circuit, so Chris first had to get the 5th Circuit’s permission to hear the appeal. After hearing Chris’ motion, the 5th Circuit agreed that reasonable jurists could debate whether Pitonyak had demonstrated a Brady violation, which means that Chris overturned the federal court’s initial denial of his right to appeal the case.

Possibility of New Trial

What this all comes down to is that Chris’ request convinced judges at the 5th Circuit Court level to allow Chris to argue on Pitonyak’s behalf for a new trial that would include the previously withheld evidence of Laura Hall’s confession. The Evidence Withheld from Pitonyak Background Mystery and sensation surround this case, which has amounted to several TV documentaries and national interviews trying to tease apart an understanding of what really happened.

What we do know for sure is that in August of 2005, Jennifer Cave was found shot to death and chopped up into pieces, and left in the bathroom and in trash bags of Pitonyak’s apartment. After the incident, Pitonyak and Laura Hall fled to Mexico, where they were arrested by Los Federales and returned to U.S. Custody.

Although Pitonyak received a conviction for murder and Hall received only a ten year sentence and conviction for tampering with evidence and hindering apprehension, there has always been a major question of who really murdered Jennifer Cave. Pitonyak reports that on this night he was under the influence of xanax and alcohol to such an extent that he formed no memory of what happened. In Texas, voluntary intoxication is not a defense to a crime, but it can leave a lot unknown. The prosecution struggled to come up with a motive for why Pitonyak would want Cave dead, but what is known is that Pitonyak had a romantic relationship with both Cave and Hall.

The New Evidence In 2009, when Joe and Chris began working on Pitonyak’s appeal, they came across a record from Hall’s jail stay that indicated two other inmates informed a counselor that Hall was “acting crazy” and had confessed to killing Cave. Since then, these two women have provided sworn statements that this was in fact true. Others have come forward as well to say that Hall confessed to being the killer.

What Chris and Joe are trying to argue is that if this information had not been withheld from the defense team, then it could have been used at trial, giving the jury a lot more to chew on when deciding Pitonyak’s innocence or guilt.

Why This Matters

Whenever I hear this story, my heart goes out to the deceased victim and her family. I cannot imagine what this process has been like for the victim’s family, and how for them more than anyone, getting to the bottom of this matters most for closure and their grief process. The fact that Jennifer Cave died so gruesomely and prematurely will never be okay.

This also has an impact on all of us. We live in a country that says we each have the right to a fair trial and to be seen as innocent until proven guilty, beyond a reasonable doubt. If evidence this substantial was withheld from the criminal defense team, then there is an issue of personal liberty at hand. Pitonyak was not allowed the fair fight we have all been guaranteed.

Hearing this story and this new evidence doesn’t answer all the questions for me about the truth of Jennifer Cave’s devastating death. It doesn’t mean Pitonyak is innocent. Yet, it does mean we should all want to know more and take a closer look. Not just to find the truth in this case, but also to uphold the highest standard of fairness in our criminal justice system.

My hope, and I believe the goal of the system, is that if both sides – prosecution and defense – fight fairly but zealously, then the truth will ultimately be unveiled. That didn’t happen in this case, so we are left in the dark about why a young man is serving a 55-year sentence for a crime we can’t honestly say he committed.

I’m thankful that there are attorneys like Chris and Joe Turner willing to turn over every stone to make sure their clients’ rights are protected and the prosecution is held accountable. In the end, we all want justice to be served, but not at the price of the truth.

What’s Next

Chris and Joe have now been given permission to file a comprehensive brief to be turned in next month. If the 5th Circuit finds that the Brady evidence undermines confidence in the jury’s verdict, then a new trial in Austin will be ordered for Pitonyak.