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hris Perri Law is a criminal defense law firm located in Austin, Texas.

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Chris' Blog

The blog of Chris Perri Law, written by Chris Perri and Shannon Perri. Read the latest in exciting cases where justice is served.

Filtering by Category: Federal

Recent Supreme Court Decision Protects 4th Amendment Rights During Traffic Stops

Chris Perri

Last week, in Rodriguez v. United States, the Supreme Court clarified that police officers may not prolong a traffic stop in order to conduct a dog sniff on a vehicle, unless there is reasonable suspicion to believe that the occupants are engaged in criminal activity.

In this case, the defendant was pulled over in Nebraska for illegally driving on the shoulder of the highway. About 20 minutes later, the police officer issued a warning ticket for the traffic infraction. However, the defendant was not yet “free to leave.” The police officer instructed the defendant to exit his vehicle and stand in front of the patrol car while they waited for another police unit to arrive. About seven more minutes elapsed before the arrival of the backup unit. At this point, the officer led a drug-detecting dog around the defendant’s vehicle. The dog alerted to the presence of drugs, and a subsequent search of the defendant’s vehicle revealed a large quantity of methamphetamine. The defendant was convicted and sentenced to five years in federal prison.

On appeal, the Government argued that waiting a mere seven minutes for the drug dog to sniff the outside of defendant’s vehicle constituted a de minimus (minimal) intrusion on the defendant’s Fourth Amendment rights, meaning that the intrusion was so minor that it was constitutionally permissible. Fortunately, our Supreme Court rejected this argument. The Court noted that certain intrusions, such as asking a person to step outside the vehicle during a lawful traffic stop, are “negligibly burdensome precautions” that allow an officer to complete the traffic stop “mission” safely. “On-scene investigation into other crimes, however, detours from that mission,” wrote Justice Ginsburg, who authored the majority opinion.

An officer may not prolong a traffic stop in order to conduct a dog sniff unless facts are developed during the traffic stop that support reasonable suspicion of drug activity. For example, if an officer smells drugs during the stop or notes a contradiction between the driver’s and passenger’s statements regarding their travel itinerary, the officer might have reasonable suspicion to prolong the stop in order to investigate drug activity. However, an officer can’t conduct a dog sniff on a car based on a mere hunch that’s not supported by actual observations of suspicious activity.

Even if the officer had conducted the dog sniff prior to issuing the warning ticket, the result would be the same: “The critical question, then, is not whether the dog sniff occurs before or after the officer issues a ticket, but whether conducting the sniff ‘prolongs’ – i.e., adds time to – ‘the stop.’”

This recent case enhances Chris Perri Law’s arsenal for attacking unlawful searches at suppression hearings. We’ve begun 2015 with three victories on suppression issues, and we’ll continue to fight to protect our clients’ constitutional rights.

The 5th Circuit Invites Chris Perri Law to Present Oral Arguments Once Again

Chris Perri

It looks like I’ll be heading to New Orleans early next year! I just received word that the 5th United States Circuit Court of Appeals has granted me the opportunity to present Oral Arguments on a federal felony appellate case.

This will be my second time to argue in front of the Fifth Circuit. To read more about my previous 5th Circuit Oral Arguments, click here.

I’m looking forward to the chance to fight in court, and I’m grateful to the 5th Circuit for finding the appeal worthy of their time. 



Chris Perri Argues to the 5th Circuit why Colton Pitonyak Deserves a New Trial

Chris Perri

Last Tuesday, August 27th 2013, Chris Perri argued to a three-judge panel of the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on why his client Colton Pitonyak deserves a new trial. This notorious case has received expansive media attention, and for good reason.

For the past four years, Chris Perri fought for the case to be reexamined due to an alleged Brady violation. For further background on the case, please view one of our older, informative blog posts here.

Intrigue and mystery have laced this case from the inception. Many have speculated who actually murdered and mutilated Jennifer Cave’s body. Though Colton Pitonyak was convicted of her murder, evidence withheld by the prosecution team points to Laura Hall as the actual killer.

Capturing the attention of the 5th Circuit, Chris stated that while in the Travis County Jail, Laura Hall confessed to two other inmates that she committed the murder. These inmates then told a counselor, who recorded the information in Hall’s electronic jail file. Chris argued that had this information been made available to the defense, Pitonyak’s trial strategy would have been entirely different and most likely led to a not guilty verdict.

The learned judges grilled Chris about whether any prior Supreme Court case had established a duty on the part of a mental-health counselor to disclose such exculpatory evidence to the prosecution team (and, thus, ultimately the defense attorneys).  While conceding that there was no such case, Chris persuasively argued that based on the Supreme Court’s Kyles v. Whitley case, the actual prosecutors had a duty to search Hall’s jail file due to the reasonable foreseeability of exculpatory evidence within that file.  After all, the prosecutors knew that Hall was talking to other inmates, including a cell mate who ended up being the prosecution’s star witness at Hall’s trial on Tampering with Evidence.  By turning a blind eye to the contents of Hall’s jail file, the prosecutors committed a Brady violation. 

Furthermore, even if the prosecutors had been blocked from accessing medical information within Hall’s jail file, they had a duty to obtain a court order or subpoena because the right to a fair trial trumps medical privacy laws. The State’s attorney countered that a subpoena for this information had been quashed, but Chris pointed out that this argument was disingenuous because it was Pitonyak who filed the subpoena while investigating the Brady claim in 2009.  The State, with the prosecutors’ blessing, actually quashed the subpoena in order to hinder Pitonyak’s ability to develop the claim.

The 5th Circuit should issue a ruling in the next month or two, though they have no official deadline.

See below to read a few noteworthy news articles and videos with Chris Perri featured:

Articles: 

Austin Chronicle article

Statesman article

The Daily Texan article

Videos: 

KXAN video 

My Fox Austin video

Keye TV video (1)

Keye TV video (2) 



 

 

 

 

 

 

Chris Perri convinces Appeal Courts to consider New Trial for Pitonyak

Chris Perri

The News of the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals’ Grant of Certificate of Appealability

About a week ago, I heard an exuberant scream coming from our home office late in the evening. As the wife of a passionate, half-Italian criminal defense attorney, I’ve heard this sound before. However, when I entered the room to inquire further, I quickly surmised from his face that the news he received was far greater and more meaningful than I first assumed.

The 5th Circuit Court of Appeals had granted Colton Pitonyak and his attorneys the opportunity to appeal the issue of a Brady Violation. Chris read to me the words from the Court that stated “the impact of the Brady Violation is perplexing and the claim deserves further review.”

After years of Chris working vigorously to get the Courts to recognize the need to explore the details of the Pitonyak case further, I knew how much this meant to him. To Chris, his legal assignments are not just a way to pay the bills, but a way to be a part of how we as humans decide to navigate the muddy trenches between right and wrong. And when Chris smells the possibility of infringement on freedom and justice, especially when it leads to someone spending a 55-year prison sentence behind bars for murder, potentially wrongfully so, like with Colton Pitonyak, he will not stop fighting for what he believes in.

What Does This Mean?

Brady Violation

After getting past the emotional impact this had for Chris and Joe Turner, the other attorney involved in the Pitonyak writ, I wanted to further understand what the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals’ grant really means. As a social worker by training, I take a lot of interest in the human stories told throughout the criminal justice system, as this system is partly a reflection of our society’s values.

I learned that firstly, one must understand that a Brady Violation occurs when the prosecution’s failure to disclose evidence to the defense deprives the defendant of a fair trial.

Overturn of Prior Federal Denial

I also learned that prior to applying for the right to be heard at the 5th Circuit Federal level, Chris first had to exhaust all claims at the state court level. The state courts denied Chris’ request and stated that “the admission [of Hall’s 2005 confession] would have no reasonable impact on the trial”. Chris then filed his writ in the federal district court, but they denied him as well. That didn’t stop Chris from persevering forward to the 5th Circuit Federal level, where Chris argued that the “federal court was woefully misguided” about the law. The federal district court had denied Pitonyak the right to appeal the case to the 5th Circuit, so Chris first had to get the 5th Circuit’s permission to hear the appeal. After hearing Chris’ motion, the 5th Circuit agreed that reasonable jurists could debate whether Pitonyak had demonstrated a Brady violation, which means that Chris overturned the federal court’s initial denial of his right to appeal the case.

Possibility of New Trial

What this all comes down to is that Chris’ request convinced judges at the 5th Circuit Court level to allow Chris to argue on Pitonyak’s behalf for a new trial that would include the previously withheld evidence of Laura Hall’s confession. The Evidence Withheld from Pitonyak Background Mystery and sensation surround this case, which has amounted to several TV documentaries and national interviews trying to tease apart an understanding of what really happened.

What we do know for sure is that in August of 2005, Jennifer Cave was found shot to death and chopped up into pieces, and left in the bathroom and in trash bags of Pitonyak’s apartment. After the incident, Pitonyak and Laura Hall fled to Mexico, where they were arrested by Los Federales and returned to U.S. Custody.

Although Pitonyak received a conviction for murder and Hall received only a ten year sentence and conviction for tampering with evidence and hindering apprehension, there has always been a major question of who really murdered Jennifer Cave. Pitonyak reports that on this night he was under the influence of xanax and alcohol to such an extent that he formed no memory of what happened. In Texas, voluntary intoxication is not a defense to a crime, but it can leave a lot unknown. The prosecution struggled to come up with a motive for why Pitonyak would want Cave dead, but what is known is that Pitonyak had a romantic relationship with both Cave and Hall.

The New Evidence In 2009, when Joe and Chris began working on Pitonyak’s appeal, they came across a record from Hall’s jail stay that indicated two other inmates informed a counselor that Hall was “acting crazy” and had confessed to killing Cave. Since then, these two women have provided sworn statements that this was in fact true. Others have come forward as well to say that Hall confessed to being the killer.

What Chris and Joe are trying to argue is that if this information had not been withheld from the defense team, then it could have been used at trial, giving the jury a lot more to chew on when deciding Pitonyak’s innocence or guilt.

Why This Matters

Whenever I hear this story, my heart goes out to the deceased victim and her family. I cannot imagine what this process has been like for the victim’s family, and how for them more than anyone, getting to the bottom of this matters most for closure and their grief process. The fact that Jennifer Cave died so gruesomely and prematurely will never be okay.

This also has an impact on all of us. We live in a country that says we each have the right to a fair trial and to be seen as innocent until proven guilty, beyond a reasonable doubt. If evidence this substantial was withheld from the criminal defense team, then there is an issue of personal liberty at hand. Pitonyak was not allowed the fair fight we have all been guaranteed.

Hearing this story and this new evidence doesn’t answer all the questions for me about the truth of Jennifer Cave’s devastating death. It doesn’t mean Pitonyak is innocent. Yet, it does mean we should all want to know more and take a closer look. Not just to find the truth in this case, but also to uphold the highest standard of fairness in our criminal justice system.

My hope, and I believe the goal of the system, is that if both sides – prosecution and defense – fight fairly but zealously, then the truth will ultimately be unveiled. That didn’t happen in this case, so we are left in the dark about why a young man is serving a 55-year sentence for a crime we can’t honestly say he committed.

I’m thankful that there are attorneys like Chris and Joe Turner willing to turn over every stone to make sure their clients’ rights are protected and the prosecution is held accountable. In the end, we all want justice to be served, but not at the price of the truth.

What’s Next

Chris and Joe have now been given permission to file a comprehensive brief to be turned in next month. If the 5th Circuit finds that the Brady evidence undermines confidence in the jury’s verdict, then a new trial in Austin will be ordered for Pitonyak.